Luckey Climbers Adds the Trepiche Museum to their Roster of Institutional Clients

Luckey Climbers Adds the Trepiche Museum to their Roster of Institutional Clients

Luckey Climbers, a Connecticut–based company that designs and fabricates site-specific climbing sculptures, has designed a one-of-a-kind climber for The Trepiche Museum in Los Mochis, Mexico.  Unveiled on Mexico’s Children’s Day, April 30, the climber is the newest addition to Luckey Climbers’ growing portfolio of museum projects, which also include The Liberty Science Center in New Jersey; The Franklin Institute in Philadelphia; The Children’s Museum of Houston in Texas; W5 Belfast Museum in Ireland; Gyeonggi Children’s Museum in South Korea; and the Formel Fun Museum in Switzerland, among others.

In keeping with the Trepiche Museum’s focus on Science and Technology, Luckey Climbers created a freestanding climber that stands 22 feet tall and resembles the billowing cup form of a medusa jellyfish in motion. Children are invited to climb a series of undulating blue climbing tentacle–platforms until they reach the jellyfish’s painted bell. These platforms are placed around six helical pipes, three of which curve upwardly clockwise and three weave in the reverse direction. Safety features are thoughtfully integrated into the design: each platform is strategically placed making it impossible for a child to fall; an open wire mesh not only covers the sculpture for an added safety measure but also acts as an additional stabilizer when climbing.

The climber’s palette is drawn from the delicate blues found in some jellies native to the Pacific coast of the Americas. Its large, sun-shielding bell features the artwork of acclaimed painter Robert Reynolds.

Luckey Climbers designs are always site-specific sculptural works that help define public spaces. Some unique design features in other museums include a giant climber that resembles a mountain peak in Belfast’s W5 science and discovery center; a helix climber in the Lao Niu Children’s Discovery Museum in Beijing; a towering climber built to resemble a giant beanstalk in The Magic House Children’s Museum, St. Louis; an interactive climber at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia that creates a synchronized light show; and a climber suspended high above the ground evocative of electrons darting around its nucleus in the Liberty Science Center in New Jersey.

Spencer Luckey, the president of Luckey Climbers, aims to create architectural, abstract sculptures that activate a child’s imagination, and are reflective of children’s spontaneous exuberance. Spencer says, “Working with museums is especially rewarding as we share the same goal: to engage children and their limitless curiosities by showing the world from a multitude of perspectives. We aim to show that there are boundless possibilities and potentials and that “normal” is somewhat arbitrary and not fixed.”

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